Tags Posts tagged with "Syria"

Syria

- by - Published on
  As I make my hundredth attempt at getting our Skype connection working, I listen carefully awaiting the sound of his breath. Finally, a crackle on the line and I hear him speak. It’s a clearer connection and finally I can share his story. This is him, speaking from Iraq. “I’m a survivor of the Syrian war. I have been in Iraq since February 2013, working in IDP camps for UNICEF as Child Development Officer. Again I remember I am one of the lucky few. I’m one of the lucky few, as I write this in mid August 2014, just

- by - Published on
Syria is going through one of the world’s deadly conflicts – this civil war, which began as the “Jasmine Revolution” Arab uprising started in March 2011 it spilled over from Tunisia, the countrywide protests against president Bashar al-Assad’s government began. The Arab uprising was instigated by the dissatisfaction by populations of the ruling governments, dictatorships, corruption, and monarch rule.  Assad’s regime which has been in power for over 40 years, responded with deadly crackdowns against the armed rebellion. The Free Syrian Army and the Islamic Front, both have been fighting the regime’s troops. Last year, Hezbollah also stepped in to

- by - Published on
Israeli officials confirmed Saturday that their country had carried out an air strike against neighboring Syria, the Associated Press reported. The unidentified officials said the strike was carried out early on Friday and targeted a shipment of advanced missiles bound for Lebanon’s Hezbollah militant group, the news agency reported. It did not say where in Syria the strike had taken place. Reuters cited an unidentified US official as also saying that Israel had conducted an airstrike, apparently targeting a building. Earlier, CNN reported that Israeli planes had launched an airstrike on Syrian territory without entering the country’s air space. The

- by - Published on
By CPJ | New York An undated photo of Olivier Voisin. (AFP) A French freelance photographer died in a Turkish hospital on Sunday from shrapnel wounds he received while covering the unrest in Syria’s Idlib province three days earlier, according to news reports. Olivier Voisin, 38, had contributed work to several local and international publications, including Le Monde, The Guardian, and Agence France-Presse. His website chronicles his work from some of the world’s most dangerous countries for journalists, including Libya, Haiti, Somalia, Brazil, and Kenya. Voisin had recently crossed into Idlib province and embedded with an armed opposition group. He

- by - Published on
Taking inspiration from Palestinian, Tunisian, Egyptian, Bahraini, Syrian graffiti artists, the underground graffiti artists group, El-Horiah, of Kashmir has named itself after El-seed, a Tunisian graffiti artist who writes graff in Arabic. Horiah is an Arabic word for freedom in which the group says they believe in. They are a few young boys in their late teens and early 20s who have been making graffiti on the streets of Kashmir. From walls in the outskirts of Srinagar to the congested business hub Lal Chowk, the group has been sending messages for people to read and understand. One of the group members, a young

- by - Published on
       By Ibreez Ajaz [T]his year marked a turning point in many Arab nations. Egypt, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Oman- all were in the throes of revolt and rebellion. Masses united under one banner of resistance: “Ash-shab yurid isqat an-nizam” (the people want to bring down the regime). And so they did. They fought, protested, and lit up the night skies. They took pictures, shot videos, shared stories across the web. They took their destinies into their hands, pushed passed social barriers and religious divisions, and prevailed. As for our end…what exactly are we doing? Shut downs are per the whims

- by - Published on
Anthony Shadid by ALISON WEIR Anthony Shadid was an astounding journalist. By 43 he was legendary for his courage and lyrical, powerful reporting. He had received the Pulitzer Prize twice for his moving reports from the middle of the Iraq war and had built, as the Washington Post noted, “one of the most storied careers in modern American journalism.” He had reported from the chaos of war zones and had survived multiple crises. In Libya he had been kidnapped, beaten, and held for six days. In Palestine he had survived an Israeli bullet fired at him from 25 feet away.

- by - Published on
Bullet hole in a window in the Lebanese city of Tripoli. Sunni-Alawite armed clashes have become a regular occurrence. By Malik Al-Abdeh How do we explain the de facto civil war unfolding in Syria today? How do we predict what course it will take? How do we come up with a viable and long-term solution? A good starting point is to compare Syria with a country that bears a striking resemblance: Lebanon. This may seem surprising because the two countries (and two peoples) appear to be somewhat different. Syrians regard themselves as being superior to Lebanese because their country suppresses

- by - Published on
By Democracy Now We speak with Nada Bakri, the widow of Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Anthony Shadid, about her husband’s passion for covering the Middle East and his posthumous memoir. “House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East” chronicles Shadid’s rebuilding of his family’s ancestral home in Lebanon. “He felt like [the Arab Spring] is a dream come true for every journalist covering the Middle East,” Bakri says. “After covering it for so many years—oppression and dictatorships and wars and conflicts and violence—finally something is changing, and something positive and optimistic.” Bakri is a Lebanese-born journalist

STAY CONNECTED

82,620FansLike
14Subscribers+1
3FollowersFollow
1,527FollowersFollow