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Mirza Waheed

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By Ishrat Bashir We were the people who were not in the papers; We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print. Margret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale Nationalisms ‘have typically sprung from masculinized memory, masculinized humiliation and masculinized hope’, remarks Cynthia Enloe in Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics. So is Mirza Waheed’s debut novel The Collaborator, typically a ‘masculinized’ narrative in which women are pushed to ‘the edges of print’. The women in the narrative come across as ‘ghosts’ and ‘shadows’ rather than real suffering human beings. Their voices are hardly heard

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They say that after much is said and done, much is said than done. As more and more unmarked graves crop up in Kashmir, the lip service to the skeletal remains of those buried in them resonates across the political class. The idea of justice to those buried inside these graves, or to their near and dear ones is yet to be exhumed. Some quarters led by the Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir Omar Abdullah have called for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission —a TRC. It’s not clear whether the offer for a TRC is a ‘we’ll-tell-you-the-truth-and-you-reconcile-with-it’ or a

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Ever wondered, how does it feel to see posters of “most wanted” people on walls of buildings in Delhi streets? People with similar, same religion, belonging to the same land, where I come from— Kashmir. I read names, saw pictures and probed expressions. Of course, it hurts somewhere deep in my heart. But let me confess I was scared too. Scared of being a suspect when I looked at those posters in Connaught Place, Delhi, early this year. One night after returning from the launch of Kashmiri author, Mirza Waheed’s novel, The Collaborator at the British Council Library, with a 

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By Fahad Shah The title above, “Harud gov saridd” means Harud fell cold. The on-going extensive debate on the postponement of the proposed literary festival, Harud (Autumn) Litfest in Kashmir from 24-26 September has many colours. Some say it was the vested interest of the people who opposed the festival. Some even say that it was “Islamic fundamentalism”. How can a person with intellect raise such queries? I doubt the intellect now. It was the statement of one of the organisers, Namitha Gokhale, saying that the event is apolitical. “Apolitical” means something where political debate doesn’t exist. Though it might

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The Harud- literary festival, which was supposed to begin in September in Kashmir, has been postponed, organisers of the event said in a statement on Monday. The statement came after the controversy on the event since it was announced that the event will be “apolitical” and Kashmiri writers, Basharat Peer and Mirza Waheed opted not to attend the festival. It was to be hosted at the Delhi Public School and University of Kashmir. “It is with great sadness that we announce the postponement of the Harud Literary Festival. Born out of the best intentions to platform work of emerging and

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There are not many bookshops in Kashmir, though reading culture has seen surge for last some years.  People of all age groups are getting attracted towards books, be it—fiction or non-fiction. Leaving the city aside rural areas are far away from book reading habits only due to lack of exposure, mostly among  youth. The city centre, Lal Chowk, has got many new bookshops in the last two years. Whether it is politics, literature, fiction or business studies, reading culture in valley has paved its way through people’s hearts and minds. According to a local bookshop owner, since 90s there has

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    By Iymon Ganaie Latest books on Kashmir at Password bookshop. With Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night, Kashmir’s English writing broke the shell and registered its place on the world literary map. Mirza Waheed’s The Collaborator and the Anthology edited by Sanjay Kak, Until my freedom has come: the new intifada in Kashmir followed. Many young writers began to speak their hearts out through their writing. Reading equally gained momentum.  In Srinagar, enthusiastic readers thronged bookshops. The Kashmir Walla decided to find out if the same enthusiasm is found in north Kashmir. A survey was conducted in the students from this

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By Iymon Ganaie | Photos by Bisma Tenzu Baramulla, July 2: “We had functions in Srinagar but Srinagar is not Kashmir. Baramulla, Sopore, Kupwara is.” With these words Kashmiri writer, Mirza Waheed, started the reading of his debut novel, The Collaborator at Government Degree College, Baramulla.  A small but enthusiastic audience of students and faculty attended the reading of journalist turned writer Mirza, who read some paragraphs from his novel. The reading started with the first chapter of the book, The valley of yellow flowers.  After the reading session, an interaction session started during which the writer answered questions, of

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Sanjay Kak and Mirza Waheed in the panel of discussion. ‘Until my freedom has come – The new intifada in Kashmir’, a book, which is a compilation of essays written on Kashmir, edited by noted filmmaker Sanjay Kak was released here on Sunday. At an impressive function, Sunday afternoon, Kak said the book represented a ‘definitive moment’ in the history of Kashmir as it contained writings of both Kashmiri and non-Kashmiri writers. He said the writings were ‘representative samples of change in mind’ caused by the last year’s summer unrest. Kak termed the protests of 2010 as ‘intifada of mind

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