Tags Posts tagged with "Basharat Peer"

Basharat Peer

- by - Published on
By Fahad Shah Jaipur, India While India celebrates the 64th year of the implementation of its own constitution, the majority of the people listening to an eminent panel, discussing ‘Freedom of Speech and Expression’ in the Jaipur Literature Festival, voted that “there is no freedom of expression in India”. The discussion, on third day, attended by around 5000 people (the organizers said) were asked about the freedom of expression in India. The other option “sufficient freedom of expression” too got some votes, but still lesser. It was the part of the ongoing five day festival- a carnival of literati in

- by - Published on
By Aaqib Javeed [I]n philosophy, reality is the state of things as they actually exist, rather than as they may appear or might be imagined. In a wider definition, reality includes everything that is and has been, whether or not it is observable or comprehensible. A still more broad definition includes everything that has existed, exists, or will exist. I am writing this piece in which I will talk about the circumstances by which my reality has been constructed since childhood, till today. In childhood Sadly, my reality has been constructed with comparison since my childhood days. My parents always

- by - Published on
By Fahad Shah The title above, “Harud gov saridd” means Harud fell cold. The on-going extensive debate on the postponement of the proposed literary festival, Harud (Autumn) Litfest in Kashmir from 24-26 September has many colours. Some say it was the vested interest of the people who opposed the festival. Some even say that it was “Islamic fundamentalism”. How can a person with intellect raise such queries? I doubt the intellect now. It was the statement of one of the organisers, Namitha Gokhale, saying that the event is apolitical. “Apolitical” means something where political debate doesn’t exist. Though it might

- by - Published on
The Harud- literary festival, which was supposed to begin in September in Kashmir, has been postponed, organisers of the event said in a statement on Monday. The statement came after the controversy on the event since it was announced that the event will be “apolitical” and Kashmiri writers, Basharat Peer and Mirza Waheed opted not to attend the festival. It was to be hosted at the Delhi Public School and University of Kashmir. “It is with great sadness that we announce the postponement of the Harud Literary Festival. Born out of the best intentions to platform work of emerging and

- by - Published on
There are not many bookshops in Kashmir, though reading culture has seen surge for last some years.  People of all age groups are getting attracted towards books, be it—fiction or non-fiction. Leaving the city aside rural areas are far away from book reading habits only due to lack of exposure, mostly among  youth. The city centre, Lal Chowk, has got many new bookshops in the last two years. Whether it is politics, literature, fiction or business studies, reading culture in valley has paved its way through people’s hearts and minds. According to a local bookshop owner, since 90s there has

- by - Published on
    By Iymon Ganaie Latest books on Kashmir at Password bookshop. With Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night, Kashmir’s English writing broke the shell and registered its place on the world literary map. Mirza Waheed’s The Collaborator and the Anthology edited by Sanjay Kak, Until my freedom has come: the new intifada in Kashmir followed. Many young writers began to speak their hearts out through their writing. Reading equally gained momentum.  In Srinagar, enthusiastic readers thronged bookshops. The Kashmir Walla decided to find out if the same enthusiasm is found in north Kashmir. A survey was conducted in the students from this

- by - Published on
By Fahad Shah Under the bright ceiling of fluorescent lights in the hall of British Council Library: it was an evening for The Collaborator. A fiction novel by Mirza Waheed. Launched on Thursday, here in New Delhi in the not-so-cold evening. Mirza Waheed Applause, as he read from the first chapter of book, The Valley of Yellow Flowers. This was the earlier title but later on changed. Over seated hall of audience. Friends, Colleagues, Readers, Listeners, and of course publishers too, all were present. He, along with another Kashmiri writer, Basharat Peer was sitting in front of the guests. Peer

STAY CONNECTED

82,905FansLike
14Subscribers+1
3FollowersFollow
1,526FollowersFollow