Reviews

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Fatima Bhutto Fatima Bhutto is a conscience keeper of her sensibility. She has proved it on time and again. Her detailed memoir, Songs of Blood and Sword, had made the world knowing about the very famous Bhutto’s overtures with the real politicking of Pakistan’s tragic democracy, like never before. Then, she championed in writing uncomfortable truths of her family and politics, dutifully, and broke a firm impression that the load of powerful past can keep the flame of personal intention and integrity on toe. Remarkably, she did it when she was quite young—and now she is back, with her debut

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Siddhartha Gigoo, author of The Garden of Solitude. What made Pandits of Kashmir to migrate? What made them to live as migrants in the land which was alien to them, where the conditions were totally different to what they had in Kashmir. What made them to think that they are not the part of this community anymore? What made them to think that they do not belong to this ‘Reshi’Vaer’ anymore? Siddhartha Gigoo, who was born in Kashmir and left the valley in 1990, in his debut novel ‘The Garden Of Solitude’ has tried to answer these questions.  These questions

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Raza Rumi As Raza is Rumi, so ploy of narrower gratifications should normally evade his identity. Surprisingly (for conformity between author and editor), the cover of Delhi by heart presents this most impartial and genuine self-narration on the city Delhi as—‘Impressions of a Pakistani Traveler’. In actual, the author was never alien to this city—as like many of us, he too could see beyond the boundary without falling in guise of extreme limiting factors—such as nationality and uncomfortable equations among the two nieghbouring nations. Like insiders of this city, his comfort level is more competent with the old parts of

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Mayank Austen Soofi By Atul K Thakur Mayank is not laconic as a writer and he also breaks the stereotypical views. His book, Nobody Can Love You More on Delhi’s red light area, Garstin Bastion Road, confirms it. G. B. Road, as it is known popularly is generally considered the work place for ‘fallen women’, pimps and visitors without identity or moral position. But it’s an existing world, with running oldest profession of the civilization and also of other petty trades. Here flesh traded and could be seen from the corner, unlike Delhi’s alternative elite flesh trade market, which was

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Mohsin Hamid is the author of the 2007 novel The Reluctant Fundamentalist. He lives in Lahore, Pakistan. Photograph by Ed Kashi By Atul K Thakur [H]ow the books, in general are meant for? They are for ‘self-help’, reveals the narrator of Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, on a less cryptic note. Though he doesn’t assert its universal supremacy, but cites it’s fallible and can be deviated as well. The later conclusion, Hamid’s third novel gives that narrator is ‘other’ and reader is ‘self’-the book progresses under this existential arrangement, and through taking meticulous care of

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Nadeem Aslam Like his preceding work, The Wasted Vigil, Nadeem Aslam’s fourth novel-The Blind Man’s Garden, follows difficult overtures with the recent history. However, this new book has much bigger geo-strategic and humane canvas, as it draws the ground realities of war torn Afghanistan-Pakistan regions through immaculate sensibility and with unprecedented authenticity. The better strength of the book comes through Nadeem’s relying on his natural impulses rather submerging with the unmanageable amount of views on new world order, which runs on the notorious design of neo-imperialism. This extraordinary war novel has merit to be listed with the best of literary

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Portrait of Niccolò Machiavelli by Santi di Tito By Syed Aqeel ‘The Prince’ is a masterpiece on modern politics written by the father of modern political thought Niccolo Machiavelli. The Bible of the politician as it is called has laid the foundations of the current political system, providing a real picture of political realism and its dominance. ‘The Prince’ has been written in a more direct language rather than in an embellished or decorated style of writing, communicating a dictum of advices to ‘The Prince’ or a ruler about how to gain, retain, and exercise power in his dominion or

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By Syed Aqeel There hardly exists a race of people on earth devoid of the possession of belief in strange, mysterious and often unbelievable ‘myths’. These fascinating or horrible tales are often passed on from generation to generation through literature, historical accounts and such. The Greeks have their own mythologies; mythologies that speak of the Titans who ruled the earth before gods and of demi-gods who are the seed of gods themselves, who rebelled against the tyranny of the gods. The Egyptians too have their own set of narrations speaking of preserved mummies that are capable of being resurrected after

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A still from the film Harud               By Fahad Shah “Whatever is going on is not your fault?” tells the father, Yusuf (Reza Naji, Iranian actor) to his son, Rafiq (Shahnawaz Bhat). Harud, means autumn in Kashmiri, is a first of its kind film on Kashmir’s brutal conflict, which has been going on for decades now. The film starts with three friends going to Kupwara, a northern district close to Line-of-control, to cross over to Pakistan-administered Kashmir (PaK) for arms training. One of them is the protagonist, Rafiq. He is a teenager, looks in his early 20s, who has this

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Ever wondered, how does it feel to see posters of “most wanted” people on walls of buildings in Delhi streets? People with similar, same religion, belonging to the same land, where I come from— Kashmir. I read names, saw pictures and probed expressions. Of course, it hurts somewhere deep in my heart. But let me confess I was scared too. Scared of being a suspect when I looked at those posters in Connaught Place, Delhi, early this year. One night after returning from the launch of Kashmiri author, Mirza Waheed’s novel, The Collaborator at the British Council Library, with a 

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