Profiles

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At a time when the situation in Kashmir is, once again, on the boil one badly misses Balraj Puri for his enviable understanding and interpretation of the multiple complexities of this festering issue. Puri died in Jammu on August 30 this year. Personally, I had known him for nearly fifty years and witnessed closely his interaction with almost all the main characters of Kashmir politics. However, his intellectual acceptability across the board failed to earn him his due place in the state’s active political arena despite his legitimate aspiration to get there. Our first close interaction took place in 1968

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Abdul Sattar Ranjoor was a beloved poet, an honest politician and a fearless revolutionary. He was also my Dadaji (grandfather). His integrity and intelligence commanded the respect of Kashmiris, especially peasants and workers, whose interests he championed through his poetry and politics. When he spoke, people listened, even those higher up in society. Time and time again, he used his influence to bring solace to the downtrodden. He opened his heart and his home to the people of Kashmir. His residence was an open courthouse; when people couldn’t acquire justice in actual courts they would come to him. He would

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Dr. Dolma Tsering Anne Sweeney’s saying, ‘define success on your own terms, achieve it by your own rules, and build a life you’re proud to live,’ relates very closely to the terms by which Dr. Dolma Tsering lived her life. Her life is a story of what a woman can achieve despite innumerable challenges and against all odds. Tsering served as the first female Chief Medical Officer of Leh ­Ladakh (Jammu and Kashmir’s Norther region) for a period of five years from 2006 to 2011. She came from a remote village and reached the peaks of her aspirations whilst also

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Syed Farakh Bukhari By Arif Shafiq Badoo The streets of Kreeri village smelled of spoiled blood, and silence filled the air with smoke. The Wednesday afternoon of July 2010 saw every house abandoned in this South-western village of Baramulla district of Jammu and Kashmir. Every ear was glued to the broken window edges and heard the marching raids. The roads were blocked by the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) men and every activity was in view. It was rarely a rare scene but got disturbed by the protesters of Palhallan- a nearby village. They wanted the people of Kreeri to

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Syed Akbar Shah Shah Music Centre is a ten by ten feet shop in the core of Meena Bazar, Delhi. It is an eighty year old gramophone record shop which was started in the British India in 1930 by Syed Ahmed Shah, son of a Kashmiri born, British government servant, Syed Hassan Shah. The shop was first started in the market which used to be around the Jamia Masjid wall. During emergency period in India under Indira Gandhi’s rule, the market was shifted to Meena Bazar on August 7, 1976. Shah’s got the shop number 256. After the death of

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Hashim Qureshi Maqbool Butt said in a Special Court of Pakistan: “I have disliked self-praise but now when my role is being distorted, deliberately, I am forced to claim that at every stage of my life, I have not only supported the peoples struggle against exploitation and oppression but always actively participated in. I have consciously chosen this role for myself because I see it as Sunnah of Prophets (pbuh) and it is a way of revolutionaries. I have no doubt about the success of this role and the welfare it brings for the people. I cannot refrain from bringing

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Maqbool Butt By P G Rasool Regarding the revolutionary struggle, Eqbal Ahmad writes in Confronting Empire, “A strategy of moral isolation assumes that the adversary has based its own legitimacy on moral grounds.” For Eqbal Ahmad the strategy of moral isolation of the adversary counts high. In retrospect we can analyse the life and sacrifice of Muhammad Maqbool Butt in this context. Maqbool Butt may not have achieved the complete moral isolation of the Indian State but he definitely has thrown an everlasting moral challenge to it and he himself stands morally on highground. Since Indian state as whole is

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By Suhail Akram He had even engraved her name on his wrist.  There was a gossip that he is mad about this tall girl from his neighbourhood, but no one thought that he would go to the extent of poisoning himself of some medical drug overdose. I had seen this girl hop around my Grandma’s place quite a number of times. That was my Cousin Gulzar, in some distant chapter of his secret life. I was introduced early to the world of private tuition by him.  I have a faint memory of that day when I accompanied him, a group

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            By Saima Bhat Zareef Ahmad Zareef with great sufi poet Abdul Ahad Zargar in late 70s. Zareef Ahmad Zareef was born on April 17, 1943 in Aali Kadal, belongs to a middle class family in the Old city of Srinagar. He resides at Baadisha-i- Darwaza, near Makhdhoom Sahib Shrine. His father, Ghulam Mohi-ud-din Shah, owned an embroidery shop at Pathar Masjid and his mother, Mokhta Begum was a simple home maker. Zareef says he was dearer to his father and owes the credit of being a satirical poet to him only. He believes that this craft of satire is

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