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While a civilian uprising still continues in Kashmir since July 8 when a popular rebel commander Burhan Muzaffar Wani was shot dead in an encounter in South Kashmir, people across India have various views about the situation in Kashmir or even the politics of Kashmir. In order to find out what do youth from India think about Kashmir we asked them one question: What do you think has been going on in Kashmir for last three months? We are producing their answers verbatim here as told to our reporter Surbhi Gupta. Government forces fire tear gas shells at the funeral

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Mirwaiz Qazi Ahmed Yasir leading a protest march in South Kashmir. Photograph by Sajad Muniwardi

Since July 8, when popular rebel commander of Hizbul Mujahideen, Burhan Wani, was shot dead, a never before civilian uprising has been going on in Kashmir. Mass public demonstrations, rallies and a series of shutdowns responded by curfew, ban on internet, gag on media and bullets, pellets and teargas shells fired by the government forces. More than 90 civilians have been killed by the government forces, more than 13000 injured among whom around 1000 have been hit by pellets in their eyes. It has been a worst force used against civilian uprising by any government in Kashmir. To crush the

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In the current atmosphere, when Indians and Pakistanis, politicians, sportsmen, entertainers, media persons and regular civilians are hurling abuses at each other, it renders me unpatriotic to say that Glimpses of World History by Jawaharlal Nehru is one of my favorite books. On his death row, the deposed Prime Minister of Pakistan, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto wrote a letter to his daughter, in a similar fashion as Nehru did to Indira Gandhi, in which Bhutto also expressed his admiration for the aforementioned book. Does that exonerate my sin of daring to admire the writing of the first Prime Minister of India,

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Staring into the abyss that is monsoon time Srinagar traffic. Photograph by Alex George We stood extremely still. Exactly 10 seconds ticked away before we looked at each other again. “Rickshaw?” Kartik asked me: a formality. We sped towards the stand. Ten minutes ago, we were in a dingy little cyber café on the first floor of a dingier building somewhere in Srinagar. After making what had been a series of bad decisions, we, after missing our flight to Leh from Delhi, had somehow ended up in Srinagar. It was April. All the roads going east were frozen; all the

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Burhan Muzaffar Wani's funeral procession on July 9 in his native town Tral of South Kashmir. Photograph by Fahad Shah

The political narrative of Kashmir has been taken over by its tech savvy youth, which is visible in the on going uprising that erupted after the killing of 22-year-old local popular rebel commander Burhan Muzaffar Wani. The Valley is prone to demonstrations and months long uprisings but the parameters of this uprising are largely distinctive. Equally, it seems the impact will be stronger and unique. Since 2010 when 15-year-old Wani had become a militant of Hizbul Mujahideen outfit and later its commander, his popularity swelled at high pace. Wani’s charm for his generation and use of new means to run

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A campaign started by Amnesty International to seek Khurram Parvez’s release along with many other detained under Public Safety Act (PSA) in Kashmir. On the day of Khurram Parvez’s arrest on September 16 and minutes before he was taken to police control room for a medical check up, he spoke to me briefly for two minutes. His words were brief too. “You have to be brave,” he said to me. His voice, like always – as it sounds to me – was reassuring and spirited. In these years that I have known him, first from distance as a young journalist

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The first episode of the series produced by Video Daddy can be watched here. “…the colour of my soul is iron-grey and sad bats wheel about the steeple of my dreams.” – Claude Debussy Kashmir has always been a paradisaical place. A verdant land, in the absolute lap of the Himalayas. While living in Mumbai, I was in constant touch with some of my Kashmiri friends. So it was not like I had no idea of what it was like in Kashmir. But a month and a half back, when we arrived in Srinagar with the idea of making videos about

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In the last more than three months we have seen the worst form of state violence against civilians in Kashmir. It is not the first time and it may not be the last time either that people of Kashmir are facing such crackdown after being killed and maimed for speaking about their rights. Dissent is everyone’s right and to express it fully is an equal right. But we are living in the times where dissenters are believed to be violent people who only want destruction and bloodbath. As much as one condemns such brutal state of affairs, it also tells

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* Aritry Das is currently pursuing her post-graduation in Journalism. She takes photographs, writes poems, listens to ghazals, and propounds a little bit of Anarchism and is an art and literature enthusiast and a vocal feminist.

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Journalist Rana Ayyub and the cover of her latest book “Gujarat Files: Anatomy of a cover up” India’s Twitter friendly Home Minister Rajnath Singh, who has embarrassed the government several times recently through his over enthusiastic slip of tongues, be it in the Pathankot or the JNU issue, recently made a very interesting statement. Asked by a journalist about the Narendra Modi government’s approach to Islamist terror, Singh said that this government departed from the previous government’s approach of indiscriminate arrests and persecution of Muslims. His government followed, what he called “a balanced and a nuanced approach”. The statement was

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