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Balraj Dungar (centre) along with other members speaking to media. Photograph by Munish Kumar When Mohammed Iqbal (36) left his home in Hapur on the morning of 6 February 2017, he was carrying 40,000 rupees in cash. A cattle sales middleman by trade, his destination was the Bulandshahar cattle market — a weekly cattle market about 40 kilometres from his home — and his objective was to buy two buffaloes which he would sell onwards to a slaughterhouse in Hapur. This had been his routine every Monday for the last eleven years. “It was supposed to be routine,” Iqbal told

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A protest in Delhi against cow vigilantism in India. The violent activism of self-styled ‘cow protectors’, who call themselves ‘Gau rakshaks’, involves thrashing, harassing and lynching people — anytime, anywhere. And with the rise of violent cow vigilantism, ‘gau’ (cow) is now more important than humans in this country. Lynching incidents have happened in the country for the last few years, and have even led our Prime Minister to theatrically shed tears over the killings and condemn them. But, the gau rakshaks remain undeterred. In recent years, incidents of brutal lynchings in the name of cow protectionism have become common

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A group of children with toy guns in South Kashmir. Photograph by Aakash Hassan Ten-year-old Zahan pulls out his “gun” from the folds of cloth kept next to his school bag. Cleaning it thoroughly, Shameema, his mother, puts her hand on his head. Zahan steps out of his house and walks through the dusky lanes of dense willows to meet his companions. Zahan, “commander” of his “rebel” group, is 10. As he reaches, he is warmly welcomed by his friends–the “guns” slugging over their shoulders and some held firm with their soft hands, pointed upwards. The famous willow of Kashmir

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While a civilian uprising still continues in Kashmir since July 8 when a popular rebel commander Burhan Muzaffar Wani was shot dead in an encounter in South Kashmir, people across India have various views about the situation in Kashmir or even the politics of Kashmir. In order to find out what do youth from India think about Kashmir we asked them one question: What do you think has been going on in Kashmir for last three months? We are producing their answers verbatim here as told to our reporter Surbhi Gupta. Government forces fire tear gas shells at the funeral

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Staring into the abyss that is monsoon time Srinagar traffic. Photograph by Alex George We stood extremely still. Exactly 10 seconds ticked away before we looked at each other again. “Rickshaw?” Kartik asked me: a formality. We sped towards the stand. Ten minutes ago, we were in a dingy little cyber café on the first floor of a dingier building somewhere in Srinagar. After making what had been a series of bad decisions, we, after missing our flight to Leh from Delhi, had somehow ended up in Srinagar. It was April. All the roads going east were frozen; all the

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People in Pakistani-administered Kashmir or Azad Jammu and Kashmir are going to elect 41 Legislative Assembly members on 21 July 2016 and these lawmakers in turn would vote for the speaker, deputy speaker and Prime Minister. There is a lot of enthusiasm among the political parties both regional and collateral branches of Pakistani political parties, the contenders and their pledged voters. Huge public rallies, inauguration ceremonies for developmental projects, promises and pledges for next five years and above all slogans to liberate Indian held Jammu Kashmir in these public meetings and rallies are echoing aloud. The nomenclature of Azad (Free)

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Click on image to see enlarged map. Courtesy Govt. of AJK. The Election Commission of Pakistan-administered Kashmir has announced the election schedule for Azad Jammu and Kashmir’s 2016 general elections of the legislative assembly as on 21 July 2016. According to the Chief Election Commissioner, Justice Ghulam Mustafa Mughal, the constitutional tenure of the AJK legislative assembly will expire on 24 July 2016. Under the Act-74, it is mandatory to hold elections 60 days before the last date. There are 22,37,058 voters, including 12,11,842 men and 10,25,216 women in AJK’s ten districts. For refugees, in 12 constituencies, a total of 4,44,634 voters will be

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By Kabir Agarwal At his office in a western suburb of Mumbai, while sipping his daily cup of kehwa, Kashamendra Ganjoo recalls homeland. Ganjoo, now 63, grew up in his five storey home in Barbar Shah, Srinagar before his family had to leave in the 1990s. He still harbours a desire to return to his home. “Kashmir is never out of my mind. It is always in my memory. It is part of every breath I take. It defines me. It would complete me,” Ganjoo says, poignantly. “But, it is impossible to go back. Too much time has passed, too

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It is pretty difficult to tell the exact day and date the Reading Room Party was formally constituted in the Kashmir Valley, though most historians agree that it was formed around April-May 1930. What the Reading Room Party of the 1930s meant for Kashmir’s socio-political awakening then and how it is relevant to the present day Kashmir discourse when the Internet, technological advancement, digital revolution, smart phones and social media have perhaps replaced the conventional Reading Room Party, Gowhar Geelani explains. Exactly eighty six (86) years ago Kashmir’s Left-wing intellectuals established the Reading Room Party to discuss the French and

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A gathering of students at the Jawaharlal Nehru University listening to teachers and student leaders during the protests against the arrested students. Photograph by Tanushree Bhasin A young man, courageous enough to challenge the norms of the society, raised questions when no one did. He rejected religion and for whom issues faced by the marginalized and oppressed were supreme. Last month, Umar Khalid, a student of the prestigious Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, suddenly became the known face on news channels and newspapers. For news anchors, he became a Jaish-e-Mohammad terrorist, he travelled to Pakistan (even though he doesn’t

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