Interviews

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Shakeel Bakshi He has been one of the major voices against the Indian government in Kashmir. Born in 1963, he was first arrested in 1984 for his political activism and later became patron of the Islamic Students League (ISL). Participating in protests and now online debates about Kashmir politics, Shakeel Bakshi, doesn’t align himself with any of the pro-freedom groups of the region. He says, “leadership is in its evolutionary stage, only those can carry the flag of the resistance movement who will remain on principles.” He has spent eleven years in jail. The Kashmir Walla’s Muheet ul Islam talks

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One of the young among the Kashmiri musicians and singers, Mohammad Muneem, born in 1983, is the lead vocalist of a Pune based Ethnic/Sufi band called ‘Highway 61’. He is well known for giving a fresh voice to the Kashmiri songs, both as solo and also with Kashmir’s first rapper, MC Kash – whose songs pierced through the political fabric of the region. Muneem says that Kashmiris are using their talent to express their views through poetry, journalism, filmmaking, photography, music and other such fields of art for which they’re also earning acclaim. In this interview, with The Kashmir Walla’s Sarthak Maggon,

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Born and raised in Madhubani, one of India’s hinterlands, Atul K Thakur studied at the Banaras Hindu University, India. A New Delhi based journalist, columnist and financial expert, with specialization in the interface of politics and economics, has been a literary critic too. With an informal record of reviewing more than a hundred books for leading publications in India and abroad, Thakur, has expertise in going through the pages of the books and feel its essence. He has been published in several publications and recently edited a collection, India since 1947:Looking Back at a Modern Nation, covering a varied range

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  Kashmir, the disputed region between India and Pakistan, has been going through conflict since the armed rebellion started in late 80s and has resulted in grave human rights violations, killings, torture and rapes. The children of Kashmir or the Children of Conflict have faced the wrath of government forces and the draconian laws like Public Safety act (PSA). Since the mass peaceful resistance movements of 2008, the minors of this region have been arrested, tortured, and mostly booked under the PSA and put behind the bars for months. There have been instances during which children as young as 10

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In June, this year, the state government provided information of number of people arrested under draconian Public Safety Act (PSA) in seven districts of Kashmir valley as 3400. The information was given in response to an application filed under Right to Information Act by a prominent Human Rights defender, Khurram Parvez of Jammu and Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society. In March 2011, the Amnesty International, an international watchdog, released a report on the law, A ‘Lawless Law’: Detentions under the Jammu and Kashmir Public Safety Act. It said the report “documents how the Public Safety Act (PSA) is used to

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In Kashmir or other conflicts of world like Palestine, rulers have been brutal on the freedom of expression. Bans, arrests, threat continue in such a situation where people are resisting against the rule and want to register their protest. This leads to the formation of other mediums of expression, which are called “illegal or destructive”, but they find it the only way to express. One such medium is hacking groups. They hack a website and put out a message which they want world to know. A group calling itself Z Company Hacking Crew (ZHC) is an international group of hacktivists

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David Barsamian talking to Parvaiz Bukhari in New Delhi. Parvaiz Bukhari is an independent Kashmir-based journalist whose articles appear in major South Asian newspapers, journals and magazines. He was interviewed by David Barsamian in which he talks about Kashmir and many other related issues. Give a sense of what life is like in Kashmir, day-to-day interactions that average Kashmiris would have with one of the largest military forces anywhere in the world. For the first few years it’s been alternating between some sort of triumphalism and people get together and to express themselves in some political way, and a sort

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Angana Chatterji Interviewed by David Barsamian San Francisco: Among the many issues plaguing South Asia none is as violent and deeply contested as Kashmir. The major unresolved issue of the disastrous British partition of India in 1947, Kashmir has been the site of wars and the threat of wars, and probably the world’s longest and most extensive military occupation. India brooks no international meditation to address the problem. What’s the problem? A lot of Kashmiris don’t want to be part of India. They didn’t in 1947 and they don’t, probably in even larger numbers, today. The U.S., champion of human

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Pakistani Journalist, Beena Sarwar interviewed by David Barsamian. Cambridge, MA  18 January 2012 Beena Sarwar is an independent Pakistani journalist and documentary filmmaker. She is the Pakistan editor of Aman ki Asha (www.amankiasha.com), a joint initiative of “The News” in Pakistan and “The Times of India.” She was a producer for GEO TV, the largest 24/7 news channel in Pakistan.   Beena Sarwar Eqbal Ahmad, the noted Pakistani intellectual, activist, scholar, in a book of interviews that he and I did, Confronting Empire, expressed concern—and this is in the late 1990s—of what he called the Talibanization of Pakistan. Since his passing

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Eleventh February is remembered as Maqbool Butt’s death anniversary. Every year demonstrations are held in many parts of world. His followers and the people of Kashmir demand the return of his remains from Tihar Jail, where he is buried, to Kashmir. Kashmiri groups, on both sides of the dreaded line of control and all over the world, remember him well. After five years Young men in early twenties, and some younger than that crossed over to Pakistan-held Kashmir in late eighties to return as armed guerrillas and started the armed movement in Kashmir. Yasin Malik was one among them who

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