Culture

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Kashmir is the beauty of Dal Lake at sunset: the friendly shikarawalas, the mesmerized tourists and the houseboats with cheesy names. It is children slurping away at their softies. It is a family sitting around a trami, eating wazwan. It is picnics at Pahalgam, towering mountains and the sound of gushing streams. It is nomads herding their sheep. It is bakarkhanis, samovars and noon chai. It is golden leaves on chinar trees. It is Muslims and Hindus praying side by side at the Baba Reshi shrine. It is paradise on earth. Not only this, though. Kashmir is also barbed wire,

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Shahmali Begum : Mother of Maqbool Butt. From the series- “Revolution: Still in Labour Pain.” Acrylics on Canvas 30″ x 24″ Using portrait as a medium I am trying to re-discover mothers who gave birth to revolutionaries. Women – less celebrated, less remembered – who have been the backbone of movements that uphold human values and reject unjust occupations. We celebrate the heroes and celebrate their death as a symbol of our victory and continuation of a fight for truth, but we fail to celebrate the decay of these Mothers. What better place to start other than home – Kashmir.

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An Indian Parliamentarian and poet, Kabir Suman, opposes Zubin Mehta’s concert in the Jammu and Kashmir, scheduled on September 7. He said, in a statement, that “Kashmiris who are fighting so hard for their right to self determination, Freedom, do not need such a concert to get a notion of “peace” through music.” Suman is a Lok Sabha member from Trinamool Congress Party, and in past too has been writing about human rights violations in Kashmir in his poetry. “I am sceptical about the proposed Zubin Mehta concert at the Shalimar Garden, Srinagar. That’s the least I can say. A

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Srinagar, Kashmir: The civil society of Indian-controlled Kashmir is holding a cultural event Haqeeqat-e Kashmir (The Reality of Kashmir) on September 7, the day which coincides with Zubin Mehta concert scheduled to be organized by Germany along with 100-member orchestra team. In what can be termed as clash between culture and cultural aggression, the organisers say that this is in response to Mehta’s concert. While talking to a local news gathering agency GNS, Programme Spokesperson, Khurram Parvez said that the event is aimed at to pay tribute to Kashmiris who have sacrificed a lot during the past 23 years. “It will portray

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By Owais Gurkoo | Srinagar, Kashmir Rouble Nagi “Art is not something that is commercial. It is in the heart, and you have to hold it close. Art requires painting your feelings and it is for the love of the heart,” believes an artist, Rouble Nagi. Nagi is a renowned Mumbai based artist born in the Jammu division of Indian-Controlled Jammu and Kashmir. She has a deep interest in the arts since her childhood and has pursued her interest through her education. After completing graduation, Nagi did her Masters in Fine Arts from London. Nagi feels that an artist is an

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Book Review: Non-fictionGlittering Decades by Nayantara Pothen,Penguin /Viking, 268 pp; Rs499 (Hardback) For majority of the people, the transition time of Indian independence was not filled with the glittering moments. The cunning British bureaucracy, which drove the mass spirit to ultimate low, could be hardly recalled in soft terms by those who vividly feel the trauma of past. However, a class devoid of similar feelings and those who were carrying the legacy of ‘colonial hangover’ had somehow genuine appreciation for the attributes of British rule, which were offering seclusion from ‘dogs and Indians’! Otherwise, such practices are untenable in our

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By Atul K Thakur Book Review In the company of a poet by Nasreen Munni Kabir, Rainlight/Rupa, 206 pp; Rs495 (Hardback) (Non-fiction) This conversation book covers the work and life of Gulzar in high articulation. Nasreen Munni Kabir, w ho is known for her authentic knowledge on cinema has made another remarkable mark by infusing biographical element in a long interview with a timeless phenomenon-Gulzar. The best sense her conversation with Gulzar offers in not making this poet turned lyricist, a geographical indication-rather, he has presented here as someone who carries and express the steam made out of feelings. Gathering

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By Feroz Rather Raindrops of love at dawn, a song of dove on your lips,  and me and you half buried in a yellow evanescence of sands, holding (epochs in our) hands by the sea.   Frozen crusts of Time, countless clocks clattering behind me an apocalyptical chime.   Naked in the blue rivers of Kashmir she bathes, her veins burbling with blood, fish, stones, winged slogans, a raging flood soaring soaring soaring until the promise and rain of freedom…   Alone, through the smoke and rubble of a distant village now asleep by a snow-hill she walks, to the

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By Fahad Shah New Delhi, India: There is no dearth of books on India’s capital city. Still some corners of this city have fountain of untold stories. Nobody Can Love You More: Life in Red Light District is the first book on Delhi’s red light area, GB Road, authored by journalist and blogger, Mayank Austen Soofi. Austen is famous for his blog The Delhi Walla and the four guidebooks on Delhi published by HarperCollins India in 2010. Once a hotel steward, his first non-fiction book, Nobody Can Love You More has been published by Penguin India this year. During Mughals,

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