Opinion

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Britain’s labour leader, Ed Miliband (C) is greeted by supporters as he arrives to Labour Party headquarters in London, Britain, 08 May 2015. Miliband had earlier said his party had suffered a ‘difficult and disappointing night’, as the rival Conservatives won a resounding victory that gave it a likely parliamentary majority. EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA By Steven Fielding, University of Nottingham If victors get to define the reasons for their victory, then losers just get told why they’ve lost. Within hours – minutes even – of the announcement of the shock BBC exit poll at 10pm on May 7, Ed Miliband was

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Gun violence, glorification of money, powerful cars, hyper-sexualized women along with hyper-masculinity symbols became emblematic of the Hip-hop culture, in US and France.

Represent the Real hip-hop. Anyone who has ever devoted an ear to a few rap songs has heard this line. In the USA, there are numerous pioneers of the genre who self-appropriated this claim or others similar, such as ‘Keep it Real’. Through artists such as Public Enemy and KRS One to Tupac and Nas among hundreds of others, Hip-hop made its way towards public recognition in the USA due to the veracity of its message. A music to which listeners could identify to. Through depicting the subtle or obvious daily violence rising from historical and contemporary social segregation and

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A candle light vigil was held in Delhi protesting against the Delhi Rape case Earlier this week, an Indian parliament member Kanimozhi from DMK party asked the home ministry whether marital rape will be included in the definition of rape. To this, Haribhai Parathibhai Chaudhary, minister of state for home replied, “It is considered that the concept of marital rape, as understood internationally, cannot be suitably applied in the Indian context due to various factors, including level of education, illiteracy, poverty, myriad social customs and values, religious beliefs, mindset of the society to treat the marriage as a sacrament.” Despite

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Recovering from an earthquake of this magnitude requires years and years of commitment, and if we, as a people, can resolve to overcome political differences to unify in the face of greater tragedy, we will have grown as a nation, writes Amish Raj Mulmi

Where does one even start describing the scale of the devastation that has hit Nepal? It’s been five days as I write this, and every day brings out a tragedy on a magnitude that is simply beyond human to comprehend. Living outside Nepal, every bit of news is a pinprick that adds to the desperation, the compelling need to do something. But do what? Outside Nepal, where the quake can only be felt through words and pictures that are emerging from my country, it feels as if the world as one knew it has collapsed, just like the seven-storeyed house

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The Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi led Bharatiya Janata Party government at the centre will soon complete twelve months in office. Under the magnetic leadership of the former Chief Minister of Gujarat, the saffron party set an electoral record of sorts by bagging a total of 282 seats in the Lok Sabha, the lower house of Indian Parliament. This was the first time in the history of independent India that a party except for the Indian National Congress had bagged a majority of its own in the central legislature. The mandate which the electorate handed out to the Modi Sarkaar

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If they unite, Hurriyats can play a productive role in even bridging the divide between New Delhi and Islamabad, writes senior journalist and editor Shujaat Bukhari

In a rare show of unity, three main characters of Kashmir’s resistance against India– Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik—addressed a public gathering jointly at Narbal where they had gone to express condolences with the family of 16-year-old local boy Suhail Ahmad Sofi who was killed in police firing on April 18. Those who witnessed the three leaders share the stage were not sure whether it really was a gesture of unity or not. They say Geelani hesitated in shaking hands with Mirwaiz and was more comfortable in talking to Yasin Malik. There are many theories suggesting

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I cannot say that in Kashmir many moments occurred which reminded me of my native, quiet, suburb of Paris. But surprisingly, one situation certainly did.

A policeman frisking a Kashmiri in Srinagar. Photograph by Shahid Tantray While being away from home, it is not rare to find fragments of foreign experience reminiscent of moments lived at home. These déja vu of similar taste, smell or situations can not be predicted. Their instantaneous familiarity proves that you experienced that feeling before. One will keep wondering until their origins can be identified. I cannot say that in Kashmir many moments occurred which reminded me of my native, quiet, suburb of Paris. But surprisingly, one situation certainly did. It wasn’t the most expected one. Along with my Kashmiri

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    The dramatic events that unfolded last month with the Home Ministry at the helm are an ominous portent of the sinister developments underway in today’s India. The Home Minister, Rajnath Singh, declared war against a documentary which, according to senior members of the government, was made to ‘defame’ India. As if India is not already defamed, thanks to the misogynist violence that is integral to the fabric of the Indian society. What the Home Ministry hasn’t perhaps realized is that it has defamed the country once again in the eyes of the world through such mindless statements. India’s

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Hari Parbat. Courtesy: ‘Cashmere: Three weeks in a houseboat’ (1920) by Ambrose Petrocokino Kashmir. What comes to your mind when you hear the word? Perhaps you recall a perfect summer retreat of many wonderful memories ago – the snowy Himalayas, the sun setting over the Dal, and the ever beautiful landscapes of the valley. Perhaps you happen to call Kashmir home and recall the delight of wazwan, of over-friendly neighbors, and your mother’s embrace. Perhaps all you know of Kashmir is the much touted slogan – “If there is Paradise on Earth…” You are right, my friends – it is

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Kashmir is a dispute, a Muslim majority region under Indian and Pakistani control and acutely conscious of its distinct identity in South and Central Asia. This triangular reality is not just the staple of our diverse political as well as social discourses but also at the core of our national dilemma. Those upholding the idea of a pluralistic Kashmir tend to abhor the noises of Muslim identity; those drawing inspiration from religion detest  the liberal interpretations of freedom, justice and coexistence; then there are those who believe in political autonomy within India or Pakistan but are wont to dismiss the

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