Opinion

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Martyrs graveyard Sopore. Photo: Muhabit-ul-Haq There have been six killings in row within three weeks in Sopore town of North Kashmir; one by one they were shot dead at point blank range. The pattern of killings remains same – unprovocative circumstances, unarmed civilians ‘targeted’ and gunned down. The latest ‘target’ was a former militant, Aijaz Ahmad Reshi who was shot dead in Mundji area of Sopore on Monday. According to police officials, reported by an English daily, “Reshi shunned militancy long time ago and was living a normal life.” Reshi’s death followed killing of an ex-militant, 24 hours ago, who

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Someone knit this young man a nice woolly hat. HBO By Alex Farnsworth, University of Bristol and Emma Stone, University of Bristol The climate has been a persistent theme of Game of Thrones ever since Ned Stark (remember him?) told us “winter is coming” back at the start of season one. The Warden of the North was referring, of course, to the anticipated shift in Westerosi weather from a long summer to a brutal winter that can last for many years. An unusual or changing climate is a big deal. George R R Martin’s world bears many similarities to Medieval

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India gate in the capital city of India on a summer day. Photograph by newdelhi2012.blogspot.co.uk By Liz Hanna, Australian National University India is currently in the throes of yet another extreme heat event, with the death toll rising past 1,100. The current heatwave began on May 21, and is forecast to continue until May 30, with temperatures in many regions exceeding 45C, and reaching 47.6C and beyond. Delhi has now endured seven consecutive days over 44C, the worst extreme heat event recorded in a decade, according to the India Meteorological Department. Even in the mountain town of Mussoorie close to

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Since the thirteen colonies raised banner of revolt against their English masters in the eighteenth century, the resulting United States of America has always managed to manifest its position as a dominant superpower in international political arena. Hardly any event has passed in human political history since then without a certain involvement of the USA. The country jumped into the first World War late and helped to land a decisive blow to the Triple Alliance of Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy. The war had monumental effects on world affairs of that time. Empires disintegrated, European powers weakened and Russia opted out

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Women make up half of the world. Or they should have made up half the world, if the world wasn’t on a killing spree. If there is any defining reality of our times it is conflict and violence. Women are the most vulnerable section but today they are more than ever equipped to raise their voices – thanks to one word “education”. In this context Digital Gender Atlas for Advancing Girls’ Education (DGAAGE) assumes significance. March happens to be the month designated for all things about women. The U.N. designated International Day for Women being one, held yearly on the

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It is impossible to discuss the dispute between India and Pakistan over the former princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, without mentioning ‘the plebiscite’: the pledge made by both leaders of recently independent India and Pakistan – Prime Minister Jawaharhal Nehru and Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah – to hold a plebiscite to confirm (or reject) Maharajah Hari Singh’s accession to India in October 1947. Given the hurried nature of the accession, carried out in the face of mounting unrest in the state and a tribal invasion from neighbouring Pakistan, it was Mountbatten – in his capacity as Governor-General of India

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European Court of Human Rights, Strasbourg, France. Photograph courtesy: UNHCR By Marie-Bénédicte Dembour, University of Brighton As the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean continues, the public outcry against deaths at sea has forced the European Union (EU) into response mode. EU officials and member states have promised to do something about the situation. Alongside discussions about resettlement agreements, there are proposals to destroy the boats used by migrant smugglers before they can leave Libya. But this highly controversial use of force would be problematic and counterproductive on a number of levels. One of its many problems is that the destruction

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Once historical enemies, France and the United Kingdom are now aligned on several social and economic matters troubling their countries. Such phenomenon seems to have accelerated in time of the financial crisis, raging since 2008. For better or worse, the two countries have taken the habit to customarily gaze across the channel: France in order to praise the English liberal “miracle”, while UK seems to be imitating certain faction of the French political scene. If this occurrence is not likely to stop, it is however doubtful that the last recent UK general elections are a political example to follow for

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By Ivan Haigh, University of Southampton and Shari L. Gallop, University of Southampton Coastal floods are a major global hazard. In 2008, Cyclone Nargis generated a five-metre storm surge along the coast of southern Myanmar. This swept seawater 50km inland, killing a staggering 130,000 people. In 2013, Typoon Haiyan swept across the central Philippines, killing 8,000 people and destroying a million homes, with much of the damage due to high sea levels. The past decade witnessed two of the most costly natural disasters in US history: Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Sandy in 2012. Coastal flooding from these two events

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Group take. Children by Shutterstock   By Jonathan Bradshaw, University of York Children in European countries tend to report higher levels of satisfaction with their friendships while children in African countries tend to be happier with their school lives. These are just some of the findings of the Children’s Worlds study into child well-being, based on interviews with more than 50,000 children aged eight, ten and 12, in 15 countries. The study asked children in representative samples of schools in Algeria, Colombia, Estonia, Ethiopia, Germany, Israel, Nepal, Norway, Poland, Romania, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Turkey and England about key

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