Authors Posts by Kashmir Walla

Kashmir Walla

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November-December, 2014 Table of contents Dispatches Pakistan Pity Peshawar – but what prospects for a peaceful Pakistan? By MA Mistry Indonesia President Jokowi’s cabinet line-up By Kate Grealy Comment Our souls are dead By Sanaa Alimia India’s youth and politics By Kiran Sakkar Sudha Kashmir youth and the conflict By Raphael Godechot Essays Haider: The bollywood rendering of Elizabethan Hamlet By Arif Hussain Reshi & Mohammad Saad Is vote in Kashmir for India? By Latief Ahmad Dar & Fayaz Ahmad Dar Poetry Letters to Toru By Sahana Mukherjee Cover by Muhabit ul Haq

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Frustration, disillusionment, and anger are what characterize the pro-azadi camp in Kashmir nowadays. Frustrated, they should be, as the voting percentage is peaking in pattern. For them voting leads to single conclusion: legitimizing the Indian Occupation – brutal and repressive. But the point is; have Kashmiris really taken road to Indian state? Has institutional decay (Ganguly, 1996) in Kashmir been addressed so that Kashmiris now have a ‘choice to make’? If this is not the case, then, what is so different about this election that people have swung themselves into so called ‘pro Indian camp’? Psephologists, political scientists in Kashmir

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On the tarmac, I eavesdrop on Operation Tiger: Troops will burn down the garden and let the haven remain. This is home—the haven a cage surrounded by ash –the fate of Paradise.        – Agha Shahid Ali (The Country Without Post Office) What non-violent, peaceful and constitutional ways are left to your shelter to protest against your burning house, shrieks of your terrified siblings, profound silence of your sister after that helpless night, despair in the eyes of your mother speaking the uncertainty of her marital status? In past three decades many Bollywood movies have casted Kashmir in the backdrop;

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September-October, 2014 Table of contents Features The deluge in Kashmir By Adnan Bhat Kashmir floods change life of these children By Muhabit ul Haq Dispatches Philippines Govt lags, poverty haunts Haiyan survivors By Anjo Bacarisas Scotland What next after the Scottish referendum? By Mark Mistry Indonesia Indonesia remembers Munir By Kate Grealy Profile Remembering Balraj Puri By Mohammad Sayeed Malik Photography Living on the edge By Shahid Tantray A journalist’s iphone during Kashmir floods By Imran Shah Film Review Review: Haider By Ipshita Chakraborty Poetry An island of a man By Kosal Khiev Cover: Photo by Imran Shah | Design

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After the massive floods in Kashmir valley several houses were swept by the floodwater, leaving thousands homeless. The government response to the floods fury has been ineffective but several voluntary organisations and individuals have contributed to restore life to some extent, donating medicines, food, clothes, and tents. In Srinagar’s various areas, tents have been put up for people who lost their houses to the floods. Around 300 people have died in the state due to floods and the economy has seen a major downfall, that may not be recovered in just a few years. People living on roads, streets, relief

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In one of the of orphanages of Kashmir 450 orphans from different parts of the state became homeless in one day as the valley was submerged by massive floods, almost a fortnight ago. The Jammu and Kashmir Yateem Khana, an orphanage located on the outskirts of the summer capital Srinagar, is a permanent home for the children. Like many in the valley, these children too had to leave to save themselves from the floodwater. “Water started coming in from every direction late in the evening. At first we moved all the children to first floor, but as water level continued

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On most of the days Shri Maharaja Hari Singh hospital (SMHS), one of the main hospitals in the heart of Srinagar city, in Kashmir, is filled with patients, who queue-up here every morning jostling to get inside the doctor’s cabin for an appointment. But as of now, all one can see are beds, medical equipments and ambulances covered with a thick layer of sludge that has been left behind by the floodwater. On the intervening night of September 7 and 8 of this month, massive floods in Jhelum River that have been described by many as worst in over a

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Women make their way back to home to assess damages caused by floods in the area. For the last four days, Mohammed Amin Sheikh, has been making long tiring walks every morning from his damaged house in Padshahi Bagh locality of flood ravaged Srinagar – Jammu and Kashmir’s summer capital, to every relief center in the city to find some food for his family. “We have lost everything to the floods. There is no food left to feed children and we are now forced to drink flood water and use it for cooking also,” says destitute looking Sheikh, a contractual

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Part I – Srinagar areas The relief and rescue operations continue in Kashmir region that has been massively affected by the floods. Though, the weather in Srinagar was cloudy on Friday but there has been no rainfall. The Director of Weather Department, Sonam Lotus, has said that their equipments are damaged due to flood waters so they cannot forecast weather. The Delhi Met department has said the weather will remain dry for at least four days. The Supreme Court of India today said the massive floods in Kashmir valley have created horror and that a disaster of such magnitude deserves

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The death toll in Jammu and Kashmir is now nearly 200 in the worst floods in six decades in the state. More than 23,000 people have been evacuated, but lakhs remain stranded. The valley is cut off as many roads have been washed away. “Only my husband and I have been rescued. Both my sons are left behind. My house was destroyed. I was stuck on the terrace for three days,” said a resident in Srinagar. “I am 60 years old and I have never seen such a situation here. This is really scary,” another resident added. The Army has

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