Authors Posts by Fahad Shah

Fahad Shah

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Fahad Shah is a journalist, writer and filmmaker. He is the founder and editor of The Kashmir Walla magazine. He has written extensively on politics, culture and media in Kashmir for various national and international publications and was a Felix Scholar at SOAS, University of London. His latest book Of Occupation and Resistance is an anthology that focuses on the resistance and politics of Kashmir and directed the documentary, Bring Him Back.

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Burhan Muzaffar Wani's funeral procession on July 9 in his native town Tral of South Kashmir. Photograph by Fahad Shah

The political narrative of Kashmir has been taken over by its tech savvy youth, which is visible in the on going uprising that erupted after the killing of 22-year-old local popular rebel commander Burhan Muzaffar Wani. The Valley is prone to demonstrations and months long uprisings but the parameters of this uprising are largely distinctive. Equally, it seems the impact will be stronger and unique. Since 2010 when 15-year-old Wani had become a militant of Hizbul Mujahideen outfit and later its commander, his popularity swelled at high pace. Wani’s charm for his generation and use of new means to run

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One of the best journalists in the world today, John Pilger, has covered major wars like Vietnam and Cambodia and over the years have grown as a strong critic of the United States’ foreign policy. He has spoken on various issues and has been a strongly supporting end to the prosecution of the Wikileaks founder, Julian Assange. An Australian journalist and winner of Sydney Peace Prize, Pilger has been a columnist for various newspapers and magazines, including The Guardian and The Newstatesman. Last month, I spoke to John Pilger through emails to talk about some of the issues in the

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Three years after Harud (autumn) Literary festival was called off, amid scathing criticism by Kashmiri writers and civil society activists, for insisting on being controversially “apolitical” in a highly militarized conflict zone, this time J-K Government itself has stepped in to collaborate with an NGO to organize a literary festival- Sounth (spring). As state owned Doordarshan and Radio Kashmir put together the literary festival and with J-K Governor inaugurating the event, the festival looks more like an exercise meant to counter the new writing and art emerging out of the valley. “The literature festival will focus on the changing life

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It was early morning on Tuesday, a lorry enters in the courtyard of Mohammad Yusuf Bhat’s house carrying a makeshift tent that will be pitched in the courtyard where dozens of women have gathered to mourn the killing of his son. “Oh brother, are you hungry? Do you want tea? Oh groom, we are not crying, we are singing,” screams a woman. “He was a kid and they pumped bullets in his body. They are killing us in front of the whole world. We are innocents. We are being killed and then given a bad name. We want blood for

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Salman Khurshid There is no such thing called the right way of expressing dissent. Whenever Kashmiris protest against India, in any form, they are called misguided, radicals, violent, or secessionists. What forms the right way of protest can’t be imposed on people who have been protesting for almost seven decades now, and yet nothing has changed. I’m writing this piece to answer some of the people, here in London, who disliked the way the Indian External Affairs Minister, Salman Khurshid, was countered during his lecture last week. Khurshid was at SOAS, University of London, to speak on “Challenges to the

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Expelled Kashmiri students of Swami Vivekanand Subharti University (SVSU) in Meerut share their views with media persons in Srinagar on Thursday . A case of sedition has been lodged against the 67 Kashmiri students who allegedly celebrated the victory of Pakistan over India in a cricket match on Sunday. Photo: Nissar Ahmad/The Hindu   I was walking in the Bloomsbury area of London, far away from home, when I read that more than sixty Kashmiri students were expelled from a university in India. It was not a strange moment for me as there is a history. As soon as Pakistan

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One can never look into someone’s mind to find out what’s going on in there. When we write it is that something that comes out through words. There is this commonly used word “power,” that I find in several writings. What is power? Well, I haven’t reached to any conclusion to figure out. It is a process of understanding its meaning – though dictionary definitions are available in abundance. I often read how this word finds a place, comfortably, in arguments revolving around socio-political issues. Last Sunday, I found the same word being used in a newspaper column. I don’t

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For twenty-two years, Saja Shah, her husband, and their three children have lived in a two-room rented apartment. Saja, a homemaker in her early 50s, was in the process of shifting to their newly built mud-brick house, which they had begun constructing years ago. A day before moving in, on 21 October 2012, she sat drinking tea at her brother-in-law’s house when she heard gunshots. As she sat bewildered by the proximity of the firing, she heard footsteps – as someone walking in the floor above her. The gunshots were an exchange of fire between two young militants and the

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On 26 November 2008, one of India’s busiest cities, Mumbai, was attacked by ten armed men which lasted until 29 November, killing 164 people and injuring more than 300 people. Indian government claimed that the armed men came from Karachi, Pakistan and the attack was planned by the Laskhar-e-Toiba – a Pakistan based group. One of the attackers, Ajmal Kasab, was arrested alive and later hanged in 2012. According to India, Kasab confirmed the role of LeT in the attack. But what happened before the attack and during the attack in the corridors of the Indian government was behind the

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Noam Chomsky, during an interview with Hicham Yezza in London on March 10, 2011. Photograph: Nathanael Corre Twenty five years ago, Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman gave a Propaganda Model of media in the book, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media. The model is still relevant and applicable on the current situations of several countries. The model lays out five news filters: Ownership, Advertising, Sourcing, Flak and Anti-communism. The last one, anti-communism, has now become “war on terror” and “free-market”. In an interview with Andrew Mullen in 2009, the two thinkers said, “The ‘war on terror’ has provided a

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